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JANUARY 2018 BULLETIN

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Please note: Page 4 in UPCOMING EVENTS, De Mommas and De Poppas Show at Beth Sholom is SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4th at 2:00 pm (not Saturday, February 3rd)

By

Notes from the Shul

What’s happening at Temple Israel this week… and beyond.

Temple Israel is going to the Ted!

We are planning an outing on Thursday, Jan. 11, to see OId Dominion’s men’s basketball team play Western Kentucky. Start time is 8 p.m. Tickets are $12.50 each. All genders, ages and levels of basketball observance are welcome.
If you’re interested, send a check made out to Temple Israel to the office and email Phil Walzer at [email protected] (mailto:[email protected]) to let him know you’re coming.

Deadline is Jan. 2.

After many years of requests, we’re going to start having a “Chai” donation card to send out. But we need your help designing the picture on the front of the card. So, use your imagination and send us your best “Chai” design by December 31st.

Service Times
Friday – 5:45pm at Temple Israel

Saturday – 9:30am in the sanctuary

Sunday – For this week, there will only be an 8:00am morning minyan at Congregation Beth El. Sunday evening services are at 5:45pm at Temple Israel.

Monday – Thursday
7:30am at Temple Israel and 5:45pm at Beth El
(Evening minyan is at Beth El for the month of December. Evening minyan will move back to Temple Israel in January.)
If you are planning to attend minyan services to say Kaddish for a love one’s yahrtzeit, would you be willing to share some memories with us? This is a new addition to our services, which has been warmly received by everyone.

Sermon Titles
Friday – “In Praise of the Chevra Kadisha”
Saturday – “God Bless Us Everyone”

Service Leaders
Haftarah – Shirley Legum and Nancy Tucker, on the 28th anniversary of their Bat Mitzvah

The congregation is invited to a kiddush luncheon on the Evelyn Eisenberg Atrium following services.
If you would like to be a shomer, please give the office a call so we can add you to the list. Shomrim sit with a deceased after they have been shrouded and before the funeral so that they are never alone. If you would like more information, please give the office a call at 489-4550.

CHECK OUT THE TEMPLE ISRAEL WEBSITE –

WWW.TEMPLEISRAELVA.ORG –

HUGE THANKS TO TAMMY WHO HAS WORKED DILIGENTLY TO GET THE WEBSITE UPDATED. IT LOOKS GREAT!

Did you know there are recordings of Rabbi Panitz doing prayers under the “Worship” tab? You can listen and learn the prayers you hear on Shabbat.

DECEMBER MITZVAH OF THE MONTH

Holidays for Heroes is a program designed to support members of the Armed Forces community by collecting items for troop support overseas. The items collected will be sent to American Red Cross offices in Iraq, Kuwait, Djibouti and Afghanistan for distribution to service members in need.

Items being collected are:
Beef jerky and Slim Jim’s
Cup of Noodles
Full size chocolate bars
Tuna packs, tuna and chicken cracker snack packs
Rice Krispies Treats
Granola Bars
Pop Tarts
Individual packs of cookies such as Oreos, Chips Ahoy, etc.
Shampoo
Deodorant
Razors
Soap
Baby Wipes
Q-tips (travel size)
Toothbrush
Toothpaste
Chapstick
Lotion Sun Screen

Please drop off your items to the synagogue office by Tuesday, December 26th!

Temple Israel is now part of AmazonSmile!
If you shop at AmazonSmile, rather than Amazon, and choose Temple Israel as your charity,
a portion of each sale will be donated to us by Amazon.
Simply copy and paste the link below into your browser. This will take you directly to smile.amazon.com in support of Temple Israel. By using the link below, you won’t have to search for Temple Israel among almost a million other organizations. What a simple, easy way to give to your synagogue!

We have started something new at our kiddush luncheons on Shabbat. If you see someone with a red cup, that means they are a new member, or are visiting, so please go up to them and introduce yourself and help them feel at home.
The Men’s Chevra Kaddisha is looking for volunteers. Participating on the Chevra Kaddisha is the highest form of a mitzvah you can perform. You are the last contact the deceased has before the funeral and you are the one who ensures they have a proper Jewish burial. It is one of the most rewarding acts you will ever do. If you are interested, or have questions, please contact Larry Stein.

THE TEMPLE ISRAEL GIFT SHOP

We’ve just received a new shipment of some beautiful items for the Temple Israel gift shop. Do you need a gift for someone, or maybe just a treat for yourself? Come check out what your Temple Israel gift shop has to offer.

And we still have some great items in our L’Dor v’Dor Section.

We accept donations for our L’Dor v’Dor section of the gift shop all year long. Please consider any of the following items:
Menorahs
Dreidels
Torah Pointers
Seder and Matzah Plates
Tzedakah Boxes
Shabbat Candlesticks
Kiddush Cups
Challah Plates
Graggers for Purim
Jewish-themed Children’s Books

If your item(s) has a special history or meaning attached to it, please write down the information and turn it into the office with your “treasure”. We would love to be able to share its story!
All items donated are tax deductible.
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

MITZVAH OF THE YEAR
Temple Israel has joined with the United Way of South Hampton Roads in a new program called Mission United. This program will assemble “move-in kits” for qualified homeless people who are transitioning to apartments. The items we have been tasked with collecting are linens. We will collect new/gently used twin and full sized bed sheets, blankets and comforters, as well as towels and washcloths.
Please bring your donations to the synagogue office.
Thank you for your help with this most worthy project!
For $18.00, you can plant a tree in Israel
IN HONOR of a family member, friend, group or event
OR
IN MEMORY of a family member or friend

Make your check payable to Temple Israel with a note that it is for the JNF Tree Center and who/what it is IN HONOR of or IN MEMORY of. If you go to their website, www.jnf.org/jnf-tree-planting-center, you can select a certificate/tree location. If you would like a specific certificate or location, let us know when you send in your check. We will send JNF everyone’s requests.

NOTES TO NOTE

Saturday, December 30th
Shabbat Services in the sanctuary 9:30am
Rebecca Danker will be sponsoring the kiddush luncheon in memory of
Cantor Danker

Sunday, December 31st
No Religious School

Monday, January 1st
Office Closed

Tuesday, January 2nd

Rabbi Panitz’s Tuesday morning class will not meet this week

Tuesday, January 9th
Rabbi Panitz’s Tuesday morning class resumes 8:15am

Board Meeting 7:30pm

============================================================
These are the yahrzeits for the coming week. Please read through them. If you see someone you recognize, come to minyan. As a community, it is our honor to remember.
YAHRZEITS
DECEMBER 30 – JANUARY 5

DECEMBER 30
Jack Koonan
Rosalyn “Roz” Landres

JANUARY 1
Dina Coplon
Winnie Edelstein
Frieda Finberg
David Grossman
Morris London
Gertrude Peltz

JANUARY 2
Mitch Adams
Moses Krell
Medeline Legum
Irving Margulies
Sam Soldinger

JANUARY 3
Irv Friedman
Herbert Hoffman
Ethel Kramer
Abraham Levine
Marcy Powell
Rose Roth
Jeanne Stadler

JANUARY 4
Berenice Abbey
Pauleen Ammerman
Shirley Hoffman
Sara Marcus
Annette Rabiner
Leah Resnikoff
Helen Weintrob
Pauline Wishneff

JANUARY 5
Selma Flasterstein
Lillian Forbes
Leopold Loewenberg
Charles Rafal
Miriam Walman
Primitiva Yasay
Copyright © 2017 Temple Israel, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you signed up to receive notices from Temple Israel.

Our mailing address is:
Temple Israel
7255 Granby St
Norfolk, VA 23505
USA

By

Weekly Message from Rabbi Panitz 

QUESTION: I need to teach tolerance as a Jewish value. What Jewish texts can I use?

ANSWER:

For the purposes of this answer, I will assume that the questioner is envisioning teaching in settings where the primary Hebrew sources need to be available in English translation and the secondary sources will be in English. If in fact there is need for other languages (Russian for recent immigrants, etc.), that can be handled in a follow-up question.

Tolerance is a key Jewish value—although, given the high degree of polarization of Jewish opinion in both Israel and the USA, tracking the liberal vs. conservative debate that is at the heart of western political life, this claim is perhaps more challenged today than in recent times. Nonetheless, Jews ought to resist having our own tradition’s clear teachings hijacked by the compartmentalization of topics that characterizes, each in its own way, both liberalism and conservatism. Judaism has insights claimed by each camp. Tolerance belongs in both.

The Jewish notion of tolerance is rooted in the basic Jewish understanding of the relationship each of us has with the Other. Ever since Adam and Eve, the process of human development, as portrayed in Judaism, involves learning to live with the Other. Our first book, Genesis, depicts one strained relationship after another, until Joseph, at the end of the book (Genesis chapter 50) expresses the heart of the matter: we do not stand in the place of God, and therefore, we must be forgiving.

Tolerance of the Other is actually about tolerance of differences. This is the essence of the matter, because precisely by virtue of being different, the “Other” poses challenges to the “Self”

The Hebrew value concept encompassing this is “kevod ha-b’riyot”, meaning “The honor of the Other.” The word for the Other literally means “[God’s] creations”. This phrase underscores the Jewish understanding that all people are children of God. As Rabbi Akiva phrased it, “Beloved is the human, for the human is created in God’s image.” Pirke Avot 3:14.

Clearly, the chain of Jewish sources, both Biblical and Rabbinic, expressing the religion’s exhortation to Jews to obey the “Golden Rule”, is also appropriate to this discussion. Leviticus 19: 18, “v’ahavta l’reakha kamokha—love your neighbor as yourself” is the base text for this value. One of the founding fathers of the Rabbinic movement, Hillel, couched it as “What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbor”; he also expressed the fundamental obligation to balance self-respect with responsibility to others: If I am not for myself, who will be for me? And when I am for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?” (Pirkei Avot 1:14).

Within the broadest category of the “Other”, there are those concerning whom our tradition especially preaches and commands tolerance:

One such group in need of—and receiving—the protection of the halakhah (the system of Jewish law) consists of people whose physical and mental abilities are different from most others’. In the Talmud, Tractate Berakhot 58b, the Rabbis formulated a benediction to be recited upon seeing a differently-abled person, “Barukh ata… meshaneh et ha-b’riyot: Blessed are You, LORD… who makes people different.”

This rabbinic celebration of physical and mental diversity, in turn, rests upon the Biblical insistence that everyone is created in God’s image, as mentioned above: See Genesis 1:26-27. The Bible itself translates that insight from the realm of narrative into the realm of law, by prohibiting various actions that would harm the disabled either physically or in reputation: Leviticus 19:14: “Do not curse a deaf person, and do not place a stumbling block before a blind person; Fear your God.”

It follows that the worth of an individual is not limited to that person’s economic or social utility. We are commanded to be tolerant, regardless of whether the Other can be useful to us, because that is an essential part of our understanding of what it means to be human.

Hence, the Jewish description of deeds of loving kindness performed on behalf of the dying or the dead as “hesed shel emet– true deeds of loving kindness”; true, in the sense of being wholly altruistic and therefore undiminished by an expectation of reciprocity. This phrase is first attested in Genesis 47:29, when Jacob uses it to describe the request he makes of his son Joseph, to see to it that Jacob will be buried not in Egypt, but back home, in the Promised Land.

The halakhah also specifies instances where people are at risk of harming each other because of their different histories:

Classically, Jewish texts teaching tolerance are often presented as mitzvoth (commandments) concerning social and economic interactions. For example, the Jewish insistence that tolerance of others overrides narrow economic self-interest finds abundant expression in rabbinic laws about the ethical conduct of commerce. Mishnah Bava Metsiachapter 4 is an elaborate discussion of the concept of “’ona’ah”, “oppression”. For example, it is oppressive for the shop keeper to take advantage of the gullibility of children.

In that chapter, the Rabbis themselves extend their legal development of the prohibition against “oppression” to include verbal, as well as commercial, manifestations. One is not allowed to remind a penitent of his former, sinful ways, nor a convert of his immoral conduct prior to his embrace of Judaism. (To be sure, that last stricture reflects its times. Today’s converts would surely not all be presumed to have lived immoral lives prior to their becoming Jewish.) Again, in their commentary to the conclusion of Psalm 104, “yitammu chata’im min ha-‘aretz” (“Let sin disappear from the land”), the Rabbis emphasize: “sin”, and not “the sinner”. The import of this is to welcome the person whose past behavior violated the norms of our tradition, but who is now penitent. This, in turn, is connected to the theme of tolerance because it concretizes the value of suspending negative judgment on the Other.

In recent years, our society has focused increasingly on those whose sexual orientation is not fully expressed by traditional categories. The discussion has lamentably become a political wedge issue.

In adapting pre-modern Jewish sources for this contemporary discussion, it is important to remember first principles. One may read the classical halakhah and find various categories in which the tumtum and the androgenus (two categories of people whose sexual characteristics were either undeveloped or androgynous) were distinguished from males and females; but the overarching ethical reality is that all people are the Other whom we are bidden to love and respect.

The Torah devotes much attention to enjoining tolerance of those belonging to groups other than Judaism. The commandment to “love the ger” (resident alien, living in the midst of Jewish society) is a leitmotif of the Biblical law codes.

Broadly speaking, Judaism develops two arguments in favor of tolerance of the non-Jew: first, our common humanity, and second, the need for Jews to seek peace by means of deeds of kindness to all.

The first argument: The Jewish people is one branch of the human family, a family that, following Biblical narrative, is envisioned by the Rabbis as proceeding from Adam and Eve, our universal parents. Rabbinic discussions of the universal parenthood of Adam and Eve focus on the ethical implications of asserting that humans are all members of one family, and therefore, that no one can claim to be a superior breed of human to other groups. See Mishnah Sanhedrin chapter 4.

The second argument: The Rabbis codified a number of deeds of loving-kindness that Jews are expected to perform on behalf of Gentiles, as part of our commitment to darkhei shalom, the “paths of peace.” For example, Jews are bidden to visit the sick of the other nations, help in burying their dead, and so on.

In the Jewish vision of y’mot ha-mashiach, the ideal future traditionally terms “the days of the Messiah”, tolerance replaces the fratricide of current-day inter-group relations. The prophet Isaiah expressed it in stirring terms: “Nation shall not lift up sword against nation; neither shall they learn war any more.” (Isa. 2:4) Thus, the broad tradition of Jewish teachings about the high importance of achieving and maintaining peace is also a resource for the teacher, looking to show students our texts on tolerance.

A SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. General and Encyclopedic Treatments of Jewish Ethics, including topics dealing with tolerance:

Amsel, Nachum, The Jewish Encyclopedia of Moral and Ethical Issues. Jason Aronson, 1996.

Birnbaum, Philip. A Book of Jewish Concepts. Hebrew Publishing Co., 1975.

Dorff, Elliot N. The Way into Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World). Jewish Lights, 2005. See especially the concluding section, “Forward”, articulating a vision of how tolerance helps actualize a repaired world.

Freeman, Susan. Teaching Jewish Virtues: Sacred Sources and Arts Activities. A.R.E. Publishing, 1999. See especially chapter 3, “Dan L’Chaf Zechut: Give the Benefit Of the Doubt”, chapter 13, “Ohev Zeh et Zeh/ Mechabayd Zeh et Zeh: Loving and Honoring Others” and chapter 21, “Somekh Noflim v’rofay Cholim: Supporting And Healing”

Isaacs, Ronald H. Exploring Jewish Ethics and Values. Ktav, 1999.

Klagsbrun, Francine. Voices of Wisdom: Jewish Ideals and ethics for Everyday Living. Jonathan David Publishers, 1980.

Telushkin, Joseph. Jewish Wisdom: Ethical, Spiritual, and Historical Lessons from the Great Works and Thinkers. William Morrow and Co., 1994.

______________. A Code of Jewish Ethics, vol. 2: Love Your Neighbor as Yourself. Bell Tower, 2009/

2. Toleration in Biblical and Rabbinic Judaism:

Barukh Levine, “Tolerance in Ancient Israelite Monotheism”,

Jacob Neusner, “Theological Foundations of Tolerance in Classical Judaism” and

Alan J. Avery-Peck, “Tolerance of Idols and Idol Worshipers in Early Rabbinic Law…”, all in Neusner, Jacob and Bruce Chilton, editors, Religious Tolerance in World Religions. Templeton Foundation Press, 2008.

3. Philosophical Discussions of Tolerance within the Discourse of Jewish Ethics:

Fox, Marvin, editor, Modern Jewish Ethics: Theory and Practice. Ohio State University Press, 1975. See especially the role of tolerance in the ethical systems articulated by Ernst Simon, “The Neighbor Whom We Shall Love” and Emmanuel Levinas, “Ideology and Idealism”.

4. Jewish Sources and Perspectives on the Differently-Abled:

Astor, Carl, Who Makes People Different: Jewish Perspectives on the Disabled. United Synagogue of America, 1985.

Siegel, Danny and Michael Katz. Jewish Perspectives on Beauty and Ugliness. Leader’s Training Fellowship publication of the Jewish Theological Seminary, 1978.

Rabbi Michael Panitz

Masorti/ Conservative

Rosh Chodesh Tevet, 5778

============================================================
Copyright © 2017 Temple Israel, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you signed up to receive notices from Temple Israel.
Our mailing address is:
Temple Israel
7255 Granby St
Norfolk, VA 23505
USA

 

By

Notes from the Shul

What’s happening at Temple Israel this week… and beyond.

This Shabbat, December 23rd, is our Birthday and Anniversary Shabbat. If you have a birthday or anniversary in the month of December, come to services and receive a blessing – and CAKE!! Services begin in the sanctuary at 9:30am.

Temple Israel is going to the Ted!

We are planning an outing on Thursday, Jan. 11, to see OId Dominion’s men’s basketball team play Western Kentucky. Start time is 8 p.m. Tickets are $12.50 each. All genders, ages and levels of basketball observance are welcome.
If you’re interested, send a check made out to Temple Israel to the office and email Phil Walzer at [email protected] (mailto:[email protected]) to let him know you’re coming.Deadline is Jan. 2.

Service Times
Friday – 5:30pm at Temple Israel

Saturday – 9:30 am in the sanctuary as we honor our December birthdays and anniversaries

Sunday – Congregation Beth El will have two (2) morning minyan services on Sunday mornings. A traditional, non-repetitive minyan at 8:00 am and a creative minyan geared toward learning at 9:15am. Sunday evening services are at 5:45pm at Temple Israel.

Monday – Thursday
7:30am at Temple Israel and 5:45pm at Beth El
(Evening minyan is at Beth El for the month of December)
If you are planning to attend minyan services to say Kaddish for a love one’s yahrtzeit, would you be willing to share some memories with us? This is a new addition to our services, which has been warmly received by everyone.

Sermon Titles
Friday – “Learning From Mistakes”
Saturday – “The Joy of Finding Your Kinfolk”

The congregation is invited to a kiddush luncheon on the Evelyn Eisenberg Atrium following services, in honor of our December birthdays and anniversaries.
After many years of requests, we’re going to start having a “Chai” donation card to send out. But we need your help designing the picture on the front of the card. So, use your imagination and send us your best “Chai” design by December 31st.
If you would like to be a shomer, please give the office a call so we can add you to the list. Shomrim sit with a deceased after they have been shrouded and before the funeral so that they are never alone. If you would like more information, please give the office a call at 489-4550.

CHECK OUT THE TEMPLE ISRAEL WEBSITE –

WWW.TEMPLEISRAELVA.ORG –

HUGE THANKS TO TAMMY WHO HAS WORKED DILIGENTLY TO GET THE WEBSITE UPDATED. IT LOOKS GREAT!

Did you know there are recordings of Rabbi Panitz doing prayers under the “Worship” tab? You can listen and learn the prayers you hear on Shabbat.
DECEMBER MITZVAH OF THE MONTH

Holidays for Heroes is a program designed to support members of the Armed Forces community by collecting items for troop support overseas. The items collected will be sent to American Red Cross offices in Iraq, Kuwait, Djibouti and Afghanistan for distribution to service members in need.

Items being collected are:
Beef jerky and Slim Jim’s
Cup of Noodles
Full size chocolate bars
Tuna packs, tuna and chicken cracker snack packs
Rice Krispies Treats
Granola Bars
Pop Tarts
Individual packs of cookies such as Oreos, Chips Ahoy, etc.
Shampoo
Deodorant
Razors
Soap
Baby Wipes
Q-tips (travel size)
Toothbrush
Toothpaste
Chapstick
Lotion Sun Screen

Please drop off your items to the synagogue office by Tuesday, December 26th!

Temple Israel is now part of AmazonSmile!
If you shop at AmazonSmile, rather than Amazon, and choose Temple Israel as your charity,
a portion of each sale will be donated to us by Amazon.
Simply copy and paste the link below into your browser. This will take you directly to smile.amazon.com in support of Temple Israel. By using the link below, you won’t have to search for Temple Israel among almost a million other organizations. What a simple, easy way to give to your synagogue!

We have started something new at our kiddush luncheons on Shabbat. If you see someone with a red cup, that means they are a new member, or are visiting, so please go up to them and introduce yourself and help them feel at home.
The Men’s Chevra Kaddisha is looking for volunteers. Participating on the Chevra Kaddisha is the highest form of a mitzvah you can perform. You are the last contact the deceased has before the funeral and you are the one who ensures they have a proper Jewish burial. It is one of the most rewarding acts you will ever do. If you are interested, or have questions, please contact Larry Stein.

THE TEMPLE ISRAEL GIFT SHOP

We’ve just received a new shipment of some beautiful items for the Temple Israel gift shop. Do you need a gift for someone, or maybe just a treat for yourself? Come check out what your Temple Israel gift shop has to offer.

And we still have some great items in our L’Dor v’Dor Section.

We accept donations for our L’Dor v’Dor section of the gift shop all year long. Please consider any of the following items:
Menorahs
Dreidels
Torah Pointers
Seder and Matzah Plates
Tzedakah Boxes
Shabbat Candlesticks
Kiddush Cups
Challah Plates
Graggers for Purim
Jewish-themed Children’s Books

If your item(s) has a special history or meaning attached to it, please write down the information and turn it into the office with your “treasure”. We would love to be able to share its story!
All items donated are tax deductible.
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

MITZVAH OF THE YEAR
Temple Israel has joined with the United Way of South Hampton Roads in a new program called Mission United. This program will assemble “move-in kits” for qualified homeless people who are transitioning to apartments. The items we have been tasked with collecting are linens. We will collect new/gently used twin and full sized bed sheets, blankets and comforters, as well as towels and washcloths.
Please bring your donations to the synagogue office.
Thank you for your help with this most worthy project!
For $18.00, you can plant a tree in Israel
IN HONOR of a family member, friend, group or event
OR
IN MEMORY of a family member or friend

Make your check payable to Temple Israel with a note that it is for the JNF Tree Center and who/what it is IN HONOR of or IN MEMORY of. If you go to their website, www.jnf.org/jnf-tree-planting-center, you can select a certificate/tree location. If you would like a specific certificate or location, let us know when you send in your check. We will send JNF everyone’s requests.

NOTES TO NOTE

Saturday, December 23rd
Birthday and Anniversary Shabbat 9:30am

Sunday, December 24th
No Religious School

Monday, December 25th
Office Closed

Saturday, December 30th
Shabbat Services in the sanctuary 9:30am
Rebecca Danker will be sponsoring the kiddush luncheon in memory of
Cantor Danker

Sunday, December 31st
No Religious School

Monday, January 1st
Office Closed

============================================================

These are the yahrzeits for the coming week. Please read through them. If you see someone you recognize, come to minyan. As a community, it is our honor to remember.

YAHRZEITS
DECEMBER 23 – DECEMBER 29

DECEMBER 23
Blanche Brittman
Rita Goldberg
Karen Mei Solberg Laffoon
Helen Martin
Mollie Padersky

DECEMBER 24
Samuel Flasterstein
Rosalie Krampf
Lena Krause
Donald Laster
Cecilia Levine
Sol Novak
Ida Olivenbaum

DECEMBER 25
Harold Moss
Sadie Schwaid
Gertrude Shukow
Leah Slomowitz
Sadie Tabakin

DECEMBER 26
Morris Cohen
Jose Nessim
Lev Shvets

DECEMBER 27
Benjamin Brooke
Craig Budden
Cantor Isaac Danker
Ezra Eisenberg
Ethel Friedman
Mollie Gordon
Evelyn Spivak

DECEMBER 28
Dvoira Cantar
Ida Goldman
Frank Jacobson
Ethel Katz
Beverly Lebow
Charles Samuels
Anita Sandler

DECEMBER 29
Pearl Brenner
Louis Resnikoff
Hyman Sonkin
Herman Weinstock

Copyright © 2017 Temple Israel, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you signed up to receive notices from Temple Israel.

Our mailing address is:
Temple Israel
7255 Granby St
Norfolk, VA 23505
USA

By

Greetings from the Florida Reunion 12-19-17

By

Rabbi’s Recommended Reading

Dvar Torah

Rabbi Andy Shapiro Katz, Conservative Yeshiva of Jerusalem, Director of North American Engagement

Sigmund Freud considered dreams the “royal road to the unconscious” – glimpses of the way we wrestle with repressed material our ego hides from our conscious minds. For Freud, it is the dreamer who is revealed to the dream interpreter.

It would appear that this is how Joseph’s brothers understand dreams – the bowing wheat and celestial bodies signs that Joseph wants to, expects to, or thinks he already does rule over them. So they resent him, mock him, and punish him, taking the one who thinks he is above them, and casting him down.

But perhaps the real reason the brothers seek Joseph’s death, and eventually sell him into slavery, is that they fear that Joseph’s dreams reveal the future itself, not just how the dreamer feels about the past or present. If so, the brothers’ act is their desperate attempt to avert the prophecy.

But did Joseph know that his dreams were visions of the future? When Joseph tells his brother about his dreams, he does so without interpretation, so it is unclear if Joseph has already seen how everything is to unfold. Our only evidence is his silence and inaction. Before leaving to find his brothers, he speaks with his father. When he reaches Shechem, he speaks to the man who find him there. But from the moment he finds his brothers to his being taken away to Egypt, he says nothing. He does not ask them what they are doing or why, he does not cry out for them to stop, and he doesn’t bemoan his situation. He seems to accept it all, if not expect it. Whether or not he has seen the specifics, he seems confident it will turn out alright.

For the cupbearer and baker, however, Joseph not only explains the general message of the dreams, but also how and when they will come true. He delivers the pronouncements flatly, and both the cupbearer and baker accept them wordlessly, further indication of their collective belief that the future cannot be altered – either due to its very nature or the limited options available to an imprisoned man with only 3 days to live.

For Pharaoh’s dreams Joseph again interprets both their meaning and the how and when they will come true. But here, something changes. Even though the dream says that the seven bad years will fully consume the good years, such that “no trace of the abundance will be left in the land because of the famine thereafter” and that “the matter has been determined by God” he convinces Pharaoh that it is nevertheless possible to avert the negative prophecy, if only he adopts Joseph’s plan and puts a certain guy in charge of it all.

But if human action can change Egypt’s future, that opens up the possibility that the brothers’ actions had altered Joseph’s future, and Joseph is roused to action. After meeting 10 of his brothers, he sets in motion a complex and convoluted plan to get them to bring Benjamin, the 11th (42:20). Why? Because in his first dream (37:7) ALL of the brothers’ wheat sheafs bowed down to his! When all of the brothers are present in Egypt, Joseph’s first dream has come true. But in order to make the second come true, Joseph must reveal himself to his brothers and get them to convince Jacob and Leah (and the rest of Jacob’s house) to come down to Egypt (45:9). Why? Because in his second dream (37:9) the Sun and Moon bowed to him as well!

Over the course of his life, Joseph goes from one who sees, to one who interprets, to one who acts. He understands that the future is not always given; human action can prevent a negative prophecy from coming true, a positive prophecy from coming true, and can even fix a prophecy that has been broken.

As Rabbi Akiva says in Pirkei Avot: “Everything is foreseen, and free will is given.” And as Rabbi Nachman of Breslov taught: “if you believe that you can damage something, believe you can fix it”.

============================================================
Copyright © 2017 Temple Israel, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you signed up to receive notices from Temple Israel.
Our mailing address is:
Temple Israel
7255 Granby St
Norfolk, VA 23505
USA

 

By

Notes from the Shul

What’s happening at Temple Israel this week… and beyond.

Junior Congregation is this Shabbat, December 16th, at 10:30am in the Hyman B. Swartz Memorial Library.
See you there!

Temple Israel is going to the Ted!

We are planning an outing on Thursday, Jan. 11, to see OId Dominion’s men’s basketball team play Western Kentucky. Start time is 8 p.m. Tickets are $12.50 each. All genders, ages and levels of basketball observance are welcome.
If you’re interested, send a check made out to Temple Israel to the office and email Phil Walzer at [email protected] (mailto:[email protected]) to let him know you’re coming.

Deadline is Jan. 2.

HAPPY CHANUKAH EVERYONE!

Service Times
Friday – 5:45pm at Beth El – THERE WILL NOT BE A FRIDAY EVENING MINYAN AT TEMPLE ISRAEL THIS WEEK, DECEMBER 15TH!
Saturday – 9:30 am in the sanctuary as we celebrate the Auf Ruf of Marlene Brodsky and Jonathan Schulman

Sunday – Congregation Beth El will have two (2) morning minyan services on Sunday mornings. A traditional, non-repetitive minyan at 8:00 am and a creative minyan geared toward learning at 9:15am. Sunday evening services are at 5:45pm at Temple Israel.

Monday – Thursday
7:30am at Temple Israel and 5:45pm at Beth El
(Evening minyan is at Beth El for the month of December)
If you are planning to attend minyan services to say Kaddish for a love one’s yahrtzeit, would you be willing to share some memories with us? This is a new addition to our services, which has been warmly received by everyone.

Sermon Titles
Saturday – Barry Einhorn and Marvin Schulman will deliver the sermon “Another Miracle of Chanukah”

Service Leaders
Hallel – Barry Einhorn
Torah Service – Lois Einhorn
Haftarah – Wendy Brodsky
Musaf – Marlene Brodsky

The congregation is invited to a kiddush luncheon on the Evelyn Eisenberg Atrium following services, sponsored by Lois and Barry Einhorn and Wendy and Ron Brodsky, in honor of Marlene and Jonathan’s Auf Ruf.
After many years of requests, we’re going to start having a “Chai” donation card to send out. But we need your help designing the picture on the front of the card. So, use your imagination and send us your best “Chai” design by December 31st.
If you would like to be a shomer, please give the office a call so we can add you to the list. Shomrim sit with a deceased after they have been shrouded and before the funeral so that they are never alone. If you would like more information, please give the office a call at 489-4550.
CHECK OUT THE TEMPLE ISRAEL WEBSITE –

WWW.TEMPLEISRAELVA.ORG –

HUGE THANKS TO TAMMY WHO HAS WORKED DILIGENTLY TO GET THE WEBSITE UPDATED. IT LOOKS GREAT!

Did you know there are recordings of Rabbi Panitz doing prayers under the “Worship” tab? You can listen and learn the prayers you hear on Shabbat.
DECEMBER MITZVAH OF THE MONTH

Holidays for Heroes is a program designed to support members of the Armed Forces community by collecting items for troop support overseas. The items collected will be sent to American Red Cross offices in Iraq, Kuwait, Djibouti and Afghanistan for distribution to service members in need.

Items being collected are:
Beef jerky and Slim Jim’s
Cup of Noodles
Full size chocolate bars
Tuna packs, tuna and chicken cracker snack packs
Rice Krispies Treats
Granola Bars
Pop Tarts
Individual packs of cookies such as Oreos, Chips Ahoy, etc.
Shampoo
Deodorant
Razors
Soap
Baby Wipes
Q-tips (travel size)
Toothbrush
Toothpaste
Chapstick
Lotion Sun Screen

Please drop off your items to the synagogue office by Tuesday, December 26th!

Temple Israel is now part of AmazonSmile!
If you shop at AmazonSmile, rather than Amazon, and choose Temple Israel as your charity,
a portion of each sale will be donated to us by Amazon.
Simply copy and paste the link below into your browser. This will take you directly to smile.amazon.com in support of Temple Israel. By using the link below, you won’t have to search for Temple Israel among almost a million other organizations. What a simple, easy way to give to your synagogue!

We have started something new at our kiddush luncheons on Shabbat. If you see someone with a red cup, that means they are a new member, or are visiting, so please go up to them and introduce yourself and help them feel at home.

The Men’s Chevra Kaddisha is looking for volunteers. Participating on the Chevra Kaddisha is the highest form of a mitzvah you can perform. You are the last contact the deceased has before the funeral and you are the one who ensures they have a proper Jewish burial. It is one of the most rewarding acts you will ever do. If you are interested, or have questions, please contact Larry Stein.

THE TEMPLE ISRAEL GIFT SHOP

Chanukah is here, and we’re ready for you in the gift shop! We just received a new shipment of chanukiah, dreidels, and the ever popular fidget spinners, which are also dreidels! We have Chanukah candles and new kippot for men and women. Come in and browse!

We also have Chanukah items in our L’Dor v’Dor Section

We accept donations for our L’Dor v’Dor section of the gift shop all year long. Please consider any of the following items:
Menorahs
Dreidels
Torah Pointers
Seder and Matzah Plates
Tzedakah Boxes
Shabbat Candlesticks
Kiddush Cups
Challah Plates
Graggers for Purim
Jewish-themed Children’s Books

If your item(s) has a special history or meaning attached to it, please write down the information and turn it into the office with your “treasure”. We would love to be able to share its story!
All items donated are tax deductible.
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

MITZVAH OF THE YEAR
Temple Israel has joined with the United Way of South Hampton Roads in a new program called Mission United. This program will assemble “move-in kits” for qualified homeless people who are transitioning to apartments. The items we have been tasked with collecting are linens. We will collect new/gently used twin and full sized bed sheets, blankets and comforters, as well as towels and washcloths.
Please bring your donations to the synagogue office.
Thank you for your help with this most worthy project!

For $18.00, you can plant a tree in Israel
IN HONOR of a family member, friend, group or event
OR
IN MEMORY of a family member or friend

Make your check payable to Temple Israel with a note that it is for the JNF Tree Center and who/what it is IN HONOR of or IN MEMORY of. If you go to their website, www.jnf.org/jnf-tree-planting-center, you can select a certificate/tree location. If you would like a specific certificate or location, let us know when you send in your check. We will send JNF everyone’s requests.

NOTES TO NOTE
Saturday, December 16th
Shabbat Services and the auf ruf of Marlene Brodsky and Jonathan Schulman 9:30am

A Salute to the Maccabees – A Hanukkahspiel USO Camp Show 7:00pm

Sunday, December 17th
KBH Chanukah party 5:00pm – 7:00pm

Saturday, December 23rd
Birthday and Anniversary Shabbat 9:30am

Sunday, December 24th
No Religious School

Monday, December 25th
Office Closed

Saturday, December 30th
Shabbat Services in the sanctuary 9:30am
Rebecca Danker will be sponsoring the kiddush luncheon in memory of Cantor Danker

Sunday, December 31st
No Religious School

Monday, January 1st
Office Closed

============================================================

These are the yahrzeits for the coming week. Please read through them. If you see someone you recognize, come to minyan. As a community, it is our honor to remember.

YAHRZEITS
DECEMBER 16 – DECEMBER 22

DECEMBER 16
David Bunin
Rosalie Gans
Arthur Ponack
Sam Rebe
Eleanor Wolpe

DECEMBER 17
Mary Adler
Pauline Brody
Otto Feuer
Esther Goldman
Rudy Gordon
Howard Kruger

DECEMBER 18
Jacob Brody
Ralph Futterman
Charles Goldstein
Marcia Jason
Millicent Levin
Virginia McNeal

DECEMBER 19
Phillip Berlin
Charles Grossman
Jacob Jason
Benjamin Leon
Boris Yashaev

DECEMBER 20
Nancy Brenner Broock
Deborah Victorson

DECEMBER 21
Rose Simonoff

DECEMBER 22
Fredric Duffen
Steve Eichelbaum
Bert Englander
Hilda Harwicke
Estelle Imberg
Irma Kaplan
Ann O’Dette
Jeannie Sirota

Copyright © 2017 Temple Israel, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you signed up to receive notices from Temple Israel.

Our mailing address is:
Temple Israel
7255 Granby St
Norfolk, VA 23505
USA

By

Notes from the Shul

What’s happening at Temple Israel this week… and beyond.

View this email in your browser (http://mailchi.mp/13d37c4dc7a9/1wiywssk3g-498245?e=0defe36426)

SAVE THE DATE FOR OUR FANTASTIC
HANUKKAHSPIEL ON
DECEMBER 16TH AT 7:00PM
This year’s show is a USO Camp Show – you won’t want to miss it!
A light dinner will be served, including latkes!!
See you in Brody Auditorium
on the 16th!
THANK YOU for MAKING a DIFFERENCE

 

Dear Congregation,

Please know that the flashlights and batteries, tarps and insect repellent you donated will provide light, shelter, and protection from contracting diseases which are spreading to our fellow Americans in Puerto Rico who are fighting to survive.
Upon delivering the items to the Lynnhaven Dive Center, we saw the trailers that are being filled with these life-saving supplies that will be transported to aid those in such dire need, which is beyond comprehension.
So let’s join together to continue with this easy way to perform a mitzvah by participating in the next collection of items that truly make a difference in the daily lives of those who are suffering, especially in rural areas where aid is not coming fast enough. The items will need to be at Temple Israel by December 9th.
Your caring heart and generosity truly say that we as a Temple Israel family are doing our share in some small way to perform “Tikum Olam” in helping to repair a little part of our world.
Please feel free to call Marilyn at 428-2276 for additional information.

David and Marilyn Suskind-Pearline

Service Times
Friday – 5:30pm at Temple Israel
Saturday – 9:30 am in Brody Auditorium. The Second Saturday portion of our service will begin at 11:00am. We’re calling it “Sivivon Sov Sov Sov” – We’ll spin dreidels and talk about things that have happened to us in the past year.

Sunday – Congregation Beth El will have two (2) morning minyan services on Sunday mornings. A traditional, non-repetitive minyan at 8:00 am and a creative minyan geared toward learning at 9:15am. Sunday evening services are at 5:45pm at Temple Israel.

Monday – Thursday
7:30am at Temple Israel and 5:45pm at Temple Israel
(Evening minyan is at Beth El for the month of December)
If you are planning to attend minyan services to say Kaddish for a love one’s yahrtzeit, would you be willing to share some memories with us? This is a new addition to our services, which has been warmly received by everyone.

Sermon Titles
Friday evening – “Will The Real Hanukkah Please Stand Up”
Saturday – Our Second Saturday discussion

Service Leaders
Torah Reader – Marilyn Suskind-Pearline, in memory of her grandfather Benjamin Rosett, on his yahrzeit
Haftarah – Joel Rubin

The congregation is invited to a kiddush luncheon in Brody Auditorium following services.

Temple Israel is going to the Ted!
We are planning an outing on Thursday, Jan. 11, to see OId Dominion’s men’s basketball team play Western Kentucky. Start time is 8 p.m. Tickets are $12.50 each. All genders, ages and levels of basketball observance are welcome.
If you’re interested, send a check made out to Temple Israel to the office and email Phil Walzer at [email protected] (mailto:[email protected]) to let him know you’re coming.
Deadline is Jan. 2.

After many years of requests, we’re going to start having a “Chai” donation card to send out. But we need your help designing the picture on the front of the card. So, use your imagination and send us your best “Chai” design by December 31st.

If you would like to be a shomer, please give the office a call so we can add you to the list. Shomrim sit with a deceased after they have been shrouded and before the funeral so that they are never alone. If you would like more information, please give the office a call at 489-4550.

CHECK OUT THE TEMPLE ISRAEL WEBSITE –

WWW.TEMPLEISRAELVA.ORG –

HUGE THANKS TO TAMMY WHO HAS WORKED DILIGENTLY TO GET THE WEBSITE UPDATED. IT LOOKS GREAT!

Did you know there are recordings of Rabbi Panitz doing prayers under the “Worship” tab? You can listen and learn the prayers you hear on Shabbat.
DECEMBER MITZVAH OF THE MONTH

Holidays for Heroes is a program designed to support members of the Armed Forces community by collecting items for troop support overseas. The items collected will be sent to American Red Cross offices in Iraq, Kuwait, Djibouti and Afghanistan for distribution to service members in need.

Items being collected are:
Beef jerky and Slim Jim’s
Cup of Noodles
Full size chocolate bars
Tuna packs, tuna and chicken cracker snack packs
Rice Krispies Treats
Granola Bars
Pop Tarts
Individual packs of cookies such as Oreos, Chips Ahoy, etc.
Shampoo
Deodorant
Razors
Soap
Baby Wipes
Q-tips (travel size)
Toothbrush
Toothpaste
Chapstick
Lotion Sun Screen

Please drop off your items to the synagogue office by Tuesday, December 26th!

Temple Israel is now part of AmazonSmile!
If you shop at AmazonSmile, rather than Amazon, and choose Temple Israel as your charity,
a portion of each sale will be donated to us by Amazon.
Simply copy and paste the link below into your browser. This will take you directly to smile.amazon.com in support of Temple Israel. By using the link below, you won’t have to search for Temple Israel among almost a million other organizations. What a simple, easy way to give to your synagogue!

We have started something new at our kiddush luncheons on Shabbat. If you see someone with a red cup, that means they are a new member, or are visiting, so please go up to them and introduce yourself and help them feel at home.

The Men’s Chevra Kaddisha is looking for volunteers. Participating on the Chevra Kaddisha is the highest form of a mitzvah you can perform. You are the last contact the deceased has before the funeral and you are the one who ensures they have a proper Jewish burial. It is one of the most rewarding acts you will ever do. If you are interested, or have questions, please contact Larry Stein.

THE TEMPLE ISRAEL GIFT SHOP

Chanukah is almost here, and we’re ready for you in the gift shop! We just received a new shipment of chanukiah, dreidels, and the ever popular fidget spinners, which are also dreidels! We have Chanukah candles and new kippot for men and women. Come in and browse!

We also have Chanukah items in our L’Dor v’Dor Section

We accept donations for our L’Dor v’Dor section of the gift shop all year long. Please consider any of the following items:
Menorahs
Dreidels
Torah Pointers
Seder and Matzah Plates
Tzedakah Boxes
Shabbat Candlesticks
Kiddush Cups
Challah Plates
Graggers for Purim
Jewish-themed Children’s Books

If your item(s) has a special history or meaning attached to it, please write down the information and turn it into the office with your “treasure”. We would love to be able to share its story!
All items donated are tax deductible.
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

MITZVAH OF THE YEAR
Temple Israel has joined with the United Way of South Hampton Roads in a new program called Mission United. This program will assemble “move-in kits” for qualified homeless people who are transitioning to apartments. The items we have been tasked with collecting are linens. We will collect new/gently used twin and full sized bed sheets, blankets and comforters, as well as towels and washcloths.
Please bring your donations to the synagogue office.
Thank you for your help with this most worthy project!

For $18.00, you can plant a tree in Israel
IN HONOR of a family member, friend, group or event
OR
IN MEMORY of a family member or friend

Make your check payable to Temple Israel with a note that it is for the JNF Tree Center and who/what it is IN HONOR of or IN MEMORY of. If you go to their website, www.jnf.org/jnf-tree-planting-center, you can select a certificate/tree location. If you would like a specific certificate or location, let us know when you send in your check. We will send JNF everyone’s requests.

NOTES TO NOTE

Saturday, December 9th
Second Saturday services in Brody Auditorium. Traditional services will begin at 9:30am and the Second Saturday portion of our service will begin at 11:00am.

Monday, December 11th
Torah at the Beach at the home of Vivian and Burke Margulies 7:30pm

Saturday, December 16th
Shabbat Services and the auf ruf of Marlene Brodsky and Jonathan Schulman 9:30am

A Salute to the Maccabees – A Hanukkahspiel USO Camp Show 7:00pm

Sunday, December 17th
KBH Chanukah party 5:00pm – 7:00pm

Saturday, December 23rd
Birthday and Anniversary Shabbat 9:30am

Monday, December 25th
Office Closed

Saturday, December 30th
Shabbat Services in the sanctuary 9:30am
Rebecca Danker will be sponsoring the kiddush luncheon in memory of Cantor Danker

============================================================

These are the yahrzeits for the coming week. Please read through them. If you see someone you recognize, come to minyan. As a community, it is our honor to remember.

YAHRZEITS
DECEMBER 9 – DECEMBER 15

DECEMBER 9
Ben Amdursky

DECEMBER 10
Feiga Estrin
William Glazer
Al Hermelin
Sylvia Jason
Annie Sonkin
Hyman Taylor

DECEMBER 11
Archie Harris
Rhoda Mazur
Celia Pollock

DECEMBER 12
Abe Futterman
Shirley Glazer
Bessie Krampf
Beryl Oser
Etta REsnik

DECEMBER 13
David Balk
Pauline Cohen

DECEMBER 14
Shirley Agdern
Helen Englander
Malka Riess
Benjamin Rosett
Anna Rose Sandler
Issie Steinberg

DECEMBER 15
Melissa Bernstein
Samuil Estrin
Laura Kesser
Ida Korman
Sidney Slavin
Marilyn Walters

Copyright © 2017 Temple Israel, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you signed up to receive notices from Temple Israel.

Our mailing address is:
Temple Israel
7255 Granby St
Norfolk, VA 23505
USA

By

JANUARY SERVICES TIMES

Morning Services Times:

  • Minyan Services: Monday – Thursday, 7:30 am at Temple Israel
  • Minyan Services: Friday, 7:30 am at Temple Israel
  • Shabbat Services: Saturday, 9:30 am at Temple Israel
  • Minyan Services: Sunday, 8:00 am and 9:15 am at Congregation Beth El, 422 Shirley Ave, Norfolk, 23517

Evening Services Times:

  • Minyan Services Monday – Thursday at Temple Israel 5:45 pm in January.
  • Friday Evening Sabbath Services, 5:30 pm at Temple Israel
  • Shabbat Evening Service immediately follows Shabbat Kiddush, 12:30 pm at Temple Israel
  • Minyan Services: Sunday, 5:45 pm at Temple Israel.